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Employment Laws

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Netherlands

Employment Laws in the Netherlands

Updated on:
16 Jan, 2024
Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries
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EOR in 
the Netherlands
Monthly
Annually
(Save upto 15%)
$
229
/month
(billed monthly)
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Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries
EOR in 
the Netherlands
Offer banner
$
229
/month
(billed annually)
$
249
/month
(billed monthly)

Table of Content

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Building a remote team?

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The Netherlands is a famed destination for tech growth and remote work. With many cities in the Netherlands being recognized as the best places globally for tech and tech talent, the Netherlands' strong tech infrastructure, favorable government policies, and vast talent pool position this Dutch labor market as an exciting tech hub for organizations and remote workers.

While expanding into the Netherlands is an exciting and promising prospect for organizations, navigating the employment contracts and legal terrain can be complicated. The Dutch employment law is as complex as it is elaborate. With divisions into various aspects, it is crucial for any organization, employer or tech enthusiast to have a deep understanding of the intricate details of the Netherlands employment law.

This guide offers insightful information on everything you need to hire tech talent or build a formidable tech team in the Netherlands.

Overview of the Dutch Employment Laws

The Dutch labor laws are designed to protect both employees and employers, balancing rights and obligations on both sides. The Dutch labor law, which is primarily based on the Dutch Civil Code and various collective labor agreements, governs these relations.

The key aspects of employment laws include regulations concerning the employment agreement, minimum terms of employment, leave policies, termination of employment, and data protection laws. The Dutch labor system's underlying ethos is to provide a fair and safe working environment that respects the dignity and rights of the worker while also ensuring operational flexibility for employers.

Employee rights such as equal treatment regardless of sexual orientation, along with stipulations regarding the notice period and unemployment benefits, are also significant aspects of Dutch labor law. It is therefore important for employers to not only understand these laws but to integrate them into their employment contracts.

For both permanent contract and temporary contracts, Dutch labor law also mandates certain employee benefits. These include provisions for holiday entitlement and paid leave. Any violation of these provisions can result in significant legal consequences.

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Hire and pay talent globally, the hassle -free way with Skuad

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Employment Contracts in the Netherlands

The Dutch employment contracts can either be via verbal means or in writing. However, according to Dutch labor law, there are certain employment agreement terms and conditions that have to be agreed upon between the employer and employee. These terms include,

  • The name of both parties - the employer and employee
  • The type of employment agreement. It could either be fixed-term employment contracts or indefinite-period employment contracts.
  • The job description
  • place of work, and hiring date
  • The probation or trial period and notice period.
  • The Salary or wages, including the pay period.
  • The Collective Labor Agreement
  • Any other information that requires mutual agreement.

It's essential for businesses to classify their employees correctly to avoid the penalties for misclassification of independent contractors.

Fixed-term Employment Contracts

Any employment contract whose duration is for an agreed period is known as a fixed-term employment contract in the Netherlands. Also called a temporary contract, this type of contract has an established expiration date agreed upon by both parties in the employment relationship. According to the Dutch Civil Code, a fixed-term employment contract automatically changes into an open-ended or indefinite-period contract after a series of fixed-term contracts has been signed for 36 months or more.

Also, if an employee signs a fixed-term employment contract three times simultaneously from the same employer, it automatically changes to an open-ended employment contract.

The Dutch labor law also specifies that the employer has an obligation to notify the employee one month (notice period) before the termination of employment whether or not there will be an extension of the employment contract.

Open-ended Employment Contracts

This is also referred to as an indefinite or permanent employment contract and is the most common form of employment contract in the Netherlands. This type of employment contract has no termination date in its employment agreement. Termination, in this case, is usually by mutual agreement, breach of employment contract or death.

Trial Period

A probationary or trial period must be agreed upon by both parties in the employment relationship, especially for open-ended employment contracts or a fixed-term contract that spans more than two years. Typically, the trial period in the Netherlands is usually one to three months. However, the probation period can not be more than six months.

Minimum Employment Terms

Navigating the complexities of Dutch labor laws can be challenging, especially for businesses unfamiliar with the country's labor regulations. A crucial aspect to understand is the minimum employment terms that govern wage structures, working hours, and other basic work conditions.

Minimum Wage

In the Netherlands, the government sets a legally mandated minimum wage for employees. This regulation helps maintain a reasonable standard of living for all workers. The amount is adjusted twice a year, on January 1 and July 1, to account for the cost of living and economic changes.

As of 2024, the minimum wage for adults aged 21 and older stands at € 1.995,00 per month for a full-time employment basis. This wage structure ensures that all employees, including the tech talents contributing to the advancements in the Dutch tech industry, receive fair compensation for their work.

However, it is paramount for businesses to check the most recent updates from the Dutch government's official portal to ensure they meet the legal minimum wage requirements.

Working Hours

The Netherlands also has laws regulating working hours to protect employee welfare and ensure work-life balance. These guidelines are significant for tech talents who often work in highly demanding environments.

The Dutch Working Hours Act (Arbeidstijdenwet) sets the legal maximum working hours at 9 hours per day and 45 hours per week. On average, over a 16-week period, an employee should not work more than an average of 48 hours per week, including overtime. There are also provisions for rest periods and night shifts.

Non-compliance with these regulations can lead to legal troubles, including potential lawsuits, penalties, and a tarnished reputation, as highlighted in our post on common legal troubles for global businesses. For this reason, businesses should seek advice from legal professionals or trade union representatives to ensure that all employment agreements comply with Dutch labor laws.

Leave Policies

The Work and Care Act makes provisions for various forms of leaves for employees in the Netherlands. In the context of Dutch labor, these provisions form part of the employee benefits. According to Dutch labor law, employees in the Netherlands are entitled to annual or holiday leaves, parental leave, and sickness leave.

Annual or Holiday Leave

According to the Dutch Civil Code, employees in the Netherlands are entitled to an annual leave, also called holiday entitlement, that is calculated based on the number of weekly working hours recorded weekly times four. For instance, if an employee records 40 hours per week, they are entitled to 20 days of annual leave or holiday entitlement. Also, the annual leave allowance, a component of the employee benefits, is 8% of the employee's annual salary and the leave must be observed within six months after the year it was based on. However, exceptions are made for employees that were not able to take the leave due to circumstances.

Sick Leave

In the event of an employee falling sick, the Dutch employment law provides robust protection. Employees are eligible to receive 70% of their last-earned salary for up to two years, subject to a maximum amount. This percentage may be higher if stipulated by applicable collective labor agreements or the individual employment contract. Employers must consider these policies while drafting their letter of agreement with the employee to ensure equal treatment.

Maternity and Paternity Leave

The Netherlands also provides comprehensive maternity and paternity leave policies, ensuring equal treatment and that new parents have adequate time off work to adjust to their new family dynamics.

Women are entitled to a minimum of 16 weeks of maternity leave with full pay. This leave can start six to four weeks before the expected date of delivery.

As for paternity leave, the policy is also progressive. Partners (including non-married partners and same-sex partners) receive a birth leave of one work week following the birth. In addition, they can take up additional five weeks off work within six months after the birth, during which they receive 70% of their salary, up to a maximum amount per day.

While drafting an agreement, HR personnel need to take these leaves into consideration to prevent any HR compliance mistakes. The HR should always consult with trade unions and comply with any collective bargaining agreements that may be in place.

Special Leaves

In addition to the above-mentioned leaves, Dutch employment law also recognizes several special leave rights, including leave for adoption or foster care, calamity leave, short-term compassionate leave, long-term compassionate leave, educational leave, and public duties leave. These leaves, many times agreed upon with the help of trade unions, contribute to the comprehensive employee benefits that workers enjoy.

Termination of Employment

Navigating the process of termination, often involving negotiations with trade unions, can often be a challenging and complex aspect of employment relations. In the Netherlands, terminating an employment contract must be conducted according to appropriate procedures and legal stipulations to maintain a fair and respectful workplace environment. A valid notice period and respect for permanent contract stipulations are crucial in these procedures.

Valid Reasons for Termination

The first step in the termination process is having valid reasons for dismissal. Dutch employment law recognizes several valid grounds for dismissal, including economic reasons, frequent absenteeism due to sickness, incompetency, and a disturbed working relationship. Employers must substantiate these reasons adequately before proceeding with the termination.

Seeking Permission for Dismissal

The Dutch legal system places a strong emphasis on job security. Consequently, an employer cannot unilaterally dismiss an employee without first obtaining permission. This can either be from the UWV (the Employee Insurance Agency) in cases of economic dismissals and long-term incapacity for work, or from the subdistrict court for personal grounds or a combination of incomplete grounds. This is a crucial step in avoiding potential legal troubles for global businesses.

Notice Period and Severance Pay

Once permission has been granted, employers must respect the notice period, which is usually one to four months, depending on the employee's length of service. It's critical to incorporate these notice periods into your letter of agreement between employer and employee, to clarify the terms and ensure full transparency.

Furthermore, if the employer terminates the employment contract, employees are often entitled to a transition allowance, a type of severance pay. This financial compensation depends on factors such as the length of employment and the employee’s salary. It is important to note that this allowance may also include social security contributions.

Termination by Mutual Consent

An alternative to the dismissal process is termination by mutual consent. Here, the employer and the employee agree on the terms of the contract termination in a settlement agreement. This agreement should detail the termination date, the reason for termination, any severance payment, and other elements like non-compete clauses. This approach can simplify the termination process, provided both parties can reach an agreement, thus avoiding some HR compliance mistakes.

By understanding and strictly adhering to the Dutch regulations regarding termination of employment, companies can not only ensure compliance but also maintain a reputation for fairness and respect for their employees. Such diligence can make the Netherlands an attractive destination for hiring your next tech talent.

Data Protection in the Netherlands

Data protection is a crucial part of Dutch employment law, particularly for tech companies. The Netherlands implements the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which emphasizes the protection of personal data and stipulates severe penalties for non-compliance.

Employers must ensure they follow all regulations regarding the collection, storage, and usage of employee data. This involves seeking explicit consent from employees and ensuring data is stored securely and used responsibly. The Dutch Data Protection Authority provides extensive resources and guidelines to ensure compliance with data protection laws.

Enhance Compliance in the Netherlands with Skuad

In an era of digital transformation and borderless workforces, the Netherlands represents a fertile ground for companies seeking to harness the power of tech talent. However, to successfully tap into this market, organizations need to familiarize themselves with Dutch employment laws and ensure they operate within these frameworks.

In a world that's moving faster than ever, keeping pace with different country-specific regulations can seem daunting. That's where Skuad steps in. As a global employment and payroll platform, Skuad simplifies the process of hiring and onboarding contractors and employees across over 160 countries — the Netherlands included.

With Skuad, you don't have to worry about legal risks and fines. It ensures your organization is fully compliant with country-specific laws and regulations, navigating the complexities of employment laws, minimum employment terms, leave policies, termination procedures, and data protection standards.

By partnering with Skuad, businesses can place compliance at the heart of their operations without unnecessary hassles or worries. Compliance becomes part of your corporate identity, creating a solid foundation for your business to thrive on the global stage.

FAQs

What are the Netherlands' working hours?

The Netherlands has a standard working hours of 40 hours per week. Typically, this means eight hours daily in a five-day work schedule.

Can Americans live and work in the Netherlands?

Yes, Americans can live and work in the Netherlands, provided they have a residence permit and a job in the Netherlands.

Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries
Get started
limited-offer-banner
EOR in 
the Netherlands
Monthly
Annually
(Save upto 15%)
$
229
/month
(billed annually)
Start Hiring Now
Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries
limited-offer-banner
EOR in 
the Netherlands
$
229
/month
(billed annually)
$
249
/month
(billed monthly)

Table of Content

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Employment Laws in the Netherlands

Employment Laws in the Netherlands

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

The Netherlands is a famed destination for tech growth and remote work. With many cities in the Netherlands being recognized as the best places globally for tech and tech talent, the Netherlands' strong tech infrastructure, favorable government policies, and vast talent pool position this Dutch labor market as an exciting tech hub for organizations and remote workers.

While expanding into the Netherlands is an exciting and promising prospect for organizations, navigating the employment contracts and legal terrain can be complicated. The Dutch employment law is as complex as it is elaborate. With divisions into various aspects, it is crucial for any organization, employer or tech enthusiast to have a deep understanding of the intricate details of the Netherlands employment law.

This guide offers insightful information on everything you need to hire tech talent or build a formidable tech team in the Netherlands.

Overview of the Dutch Employment Laws

The Dutch labor laws are designed to protect both employees and employers, balancing rights and obligations on both sides. The Dutch labor law, which is primarily based on the Dutch Civil Code and various collective labor agreements, governs these relations.

The key aspects of employment laws include regulations concerning the employment agreement, minimum terms of employment, leave policies, termination of employment, and data protection laws. The Dutch labor system's underlying ethos is to provide a fair and safe working environment that respects the dignity and rights of the worker while also ensuring operational flexibility for employers.

Employee rights such as equal treatment regardless of sexual orientation, along with stipulations regarding the notice period and unemployment benefits, are also significant aspects of Dutch labor law. It is therefore important for employers to not only understand these laws but to integrate them into their employment contracts.

For both permanent contract and temporary contracts, Dutch labor law also mandates certain employee benefits. These include provisions for holiday entitlement and paid leave. Any violation of these provisions can result in significant legal consequences.

One platform to grow your global team

Hire and pay talent globally, the
hassle-free way

Talk to an expert

Employment Contracts in the Netherlands

The Dutch employment contracts can either be via verbal means or in writing. However, according to Dutch labor law, there are certain employment agreement terms and conditions that have to be agreed upon between the employer and employee. These terms include,

  • The name of both parties - the employer and employee
  • The type of employment agreement. It could either be fixed-term employment contracts or indefinite-period employment contracts.
  • The job description
  • place of work, and hiring date
  • The probation or trial period and notice period.
  • The Salary or wages, including the pay period.
  • The Collective Labor Agreement
  • Any other information that requires mutual agreement.

It's essential for businesses to classify their employees correctly to avoid the penalties for misclassification of independent contractors.

Fixed-term Employment Contracts

Any employment contract whose duration is for an agreed period is known as a fixed-term employment contract in the Netherlands. Also called a temporary contract, this type of contract has an established expiration date agreed upon by both parties in the employment relationship. According to the Dutch Civil Code, a fixed-term employment contract automatically changes into an open-ended or indefinite-period contract after a series of fixed-term contracts has been signed for 36 months or more.

Also, if an employee signs a fixed-term employment contract three times simultaneously from the same employer, it automatically changes to an open-ended employment contract.

The Dutch labor law also specifies that the employer has an obligation to notify the employee one month (notice period) before the termination of employment whether or not there will be an extension of the employment contract.

Open-ended Employment Contracts

This is also referred to as an indefinite or permanent employment contract and is the most common form of employment contract in the Netherlands. This type of employment contract has no termination date in its employment agreement. Termination, in this case, is usually by mutual agreement, breach of employment contract or death.

Trial Period

A probationary or trial period must be agreed upon by both parties in the employment relationship, especially for open-ended employment contracts or a fixed-term contract that spans more than two years. Typically, the trial period in the Netherlands is usually one to three months. However, the probation period can not be more than six months.

Minimum Employment Terms

Navigating the complexities of Dutch labor laws can be challenging, especially for businesses unfamiliar with the country's labor regulations. A crucial aspect to understand is the minimum employment terms that govern wage structures, working hours, and other basic work conditions.

Minimum Wage

In the Netherlands, the government sets a legally mandated minimum wage for employees. This regulation helps maintain a reasonable standard of living for all workers. The amount is adjusted twice a year, on January 1 and July 1, to account for the cost of living and economic changes.

As of 2024, the minimum wage for adults aged 21 and older stands at € 1.995,00 per month for a full-time employment basis. This wage structure ensures that all employees, including the tech talents contributing to the advancements in the Dutch tech industry, receive fair compensation for their work.

However, it is paramount for businesses to check the most recent updates from the Dutch government's official portal to ensure they meet the legal minimum wage requirements.

Working Hours

The Netherlands also has laws regulating working hours to protect employee welfare and ensure work-life balance. These guidelines are significant for tech talents who often work in highly demanding environments.

The Dutch Working Hours Act (Arbeidstijdenwet) sets the legal maximum working hours at 9 hours per day and 45 hours per week. On average, over a 16-week period, an employee should not work more than an average of 48 hours per week, including overtime. There are also provisions for rest periods and night shifts.

Non-compliance with these regulations can lead to legal troubles, including potential lawsuits, penalties, and a tarnished reputation, as highlighted in our post on common legal troubles for global businesses. For this reason, businesses should seek advice from legal professionals or trade union representatives to ensure that all employment agreements comply with Dutch labor laws.

Leave Policies

The Work and Care Act makes provisions for various forms of leaves for employees in the Netherlands. In the context of Dutch labor, these provisions form part of the employee benefits. According to Dutch labor law, employees in the Netherlands are entitled to annual or holiday leaves, parental leave, and sickness leave.

Annual or Holiday Leave

According to the Dutch Civil Code, employees in the Netherlands are entitled to an annual leave, also called holiday entitlement, that is calculated based on the number of weekly working hours recorded weekly times four. For instance, if an employee records 40 hours per week, they are entitled to 20 days of annual leave or holiday entitlement. Also, the annual leave allowance, a component of the employee benefits, is 8% of the employee's annual salary and the leave must be observed within six months after the year it was based on. However, exceptions are made for employees that were not able to take the leave due to circumstances.

Sick Leave

In the event of an employee falling sick, the Dutch employment law provides robust protection. Employees are eligible to receive 70% of their last-earned salary for up to two years, subject to a maximum amount. This percentage may be higher if stipulated by applicable collective labor agreements or the individual employment contract. Employers must consider these policies while drafting their letter of agreement with the employee to ensure equal treatment.

Maternity and Paternity Leave

The Netherlands also provides comprehensive maternity and paternity leave policies, ensuring equal treatment and that new parents have adequate time off work to adjust to their new family dynamics.

Women are entitled to a minimum of 16 weeks of maternity leave with full pay. This leave can start six to four weeks before the expected date of delivery.

As for paternity leave, the policy is also progressive. Partners (including non-married partners and same-sex partners) receive a birth leave of one work week following the birth. In addition, they can take up additional five weeks off work within six months after the birth, during which they receive 70% of their salary, up to a maximum amount per day.

While drafting an agreement, HR personnel need to take these leaves into consideration to prevent any HR compliance mistakes. The HR should always consult with trade unions and comply with any collective bargaining agreements that may be in place.

Special Leaves

In addition to the above-mentioned leaves, Dutch employment law also recognizes several special leave rights, including leave for adoption or foster care, calamity leave, short-term compassionate leave, long-term compassionate leave, educational leave, and public duties leave. These leaves, many times agreed upon with the help of trade unions, contribute to the comprehensive employee benefits that workers enjoy.

Termination of Employment

Navigating the process of termination, often involving negotiations with trade unions, can often be a challenging and complex aspect of employment relations. In the Netherlands, terminating an employment contract must be conducted according to appropriate procedures and legal stipulations to maintain a fair and respectful workplace environment. A valid notice period and respect for permanent contract stipulations are crucial in these procedures.

Valid Reasons for Termination

The first step in the termination process is having valid reasons for dismissal. Dutch employment law recognizes several valid grounds for dismissal, including economic reasons, frequent absenteeism due to sickness, incompetency, and a disturbed working relationship. Employers must substantiate these reasons adequately before proceeding with the termination.

Seeking Permission for Dismissal

The Dutch legal system places a strong emphasis on job security. Consequently, an employer cannot unilaterally dismiss an employee without first obtaining permission. This can either be from the UWV (the Employee Insurance Agency) in cases of economic dismissals and long-term incapacity for work, or from the subdistrict court for personal grounds or a combination of incomplete grounds. This is a crucial step in avoiding potential legal troubles for global businesses.

Notice Period and Severance Pay

Once permission has been granted, employers must respect the notice period, which is usually one to four months, depending on the employee's length of service. It's critical to incorporate these notice periods into your letter of agreement between employer and employee, to clarify the terms and ensure full transparency.

Furthermore, if the employer terminates the employment contract, employees are often entitled to a transition allowance, a type of severance pay. This financial compensation depends on factors such as the length of employment and the employee’s salary. It is important to note that this allowance may also include social security contributions.

Termination by Mutual Consent

An alternative to the dismissal process is termination by mutual consent. Here, the employer and the employee agree on the terms of the contract termination in a settlement agreement. This agreement should detail the termination date, the reason for termination, any severance payment, and other elements like non-compete clauses. This approach can simplify the termination process, provided both parties can reach an agreement, thus avoiding some HR compliance mistakes.

By understanding and strictly adhering to the Dutch regulations regarding termination of employment, companies can not only ensure compliance but also maintain a reputation for fairness and respect for their employees. Such diligence can make the Netherlands an attractive destination for hiring your next tech talent.

Data Protection in the Netherlands

Data protection is a crucial part of Dutch employment law, particularly for tech companies. The Netherlands implements the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which emphasizes the protection of personal data and stipulates severe penalties for non-compliance.

Employers must ensure they follow all regulations regarding the collection, storage, and usage of employee data. This involves seeking explicit consent from employees and ensuring data is stored securely and used responsibly. The Dutch Data Protection Authority provides extensive resources and guidelines to ensure compliance with data protection laws.

Enhance Compliance in the Netherlands with Skuad

In an era of digital transformation and borderless workforces, the Netherlands represents a fertile ground for companies seeking to harness the power of tech talent. However, to successfully tap into this market, organizations need to familiarize themselves with Dutch employment laws and ensure they operate within these frameworks.

In a world that's moving faster than ever, keeping pace with different country-specific regulations can seem daunting. That's where Skuad steps in. As a global employment and payroll platform, Skuad simplifies the process of hiring and onboarding contractors and employees across over 160 countries — the Netherlands included.

With Skuad, you don't have to worry about legal risks and fines. It ensures your organization is fully compliant with country-specific laws and regulations, navigating the complexities of employment laws, minimum employment terms, leave policies, termination procedures, and data protection standards.

By partnering with Skuad, businesses can place compliance at the heart of their operations without unnecessary hassles or worries. Compliance becomes part of your corporate identity, creating a solid foundation for your business to thrive on the global stage.

FAQs

What are the Netherlands' working hours?

The Netherlands has a standard working hours of 40 hours per week. Typically, this means eight hours daily in a five-day work schedule.

Can Americans live and work in the Netherlands?

Yes, Americans can live and work in the Netherlands, provided they have a residence permit and a job in the Netherlands.

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Skuad is the best solution to hire and expand globally.

Skuad makes building globally distributed teams, quick and hassle-free.

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