patterncross icon
skuad logo

✨Limited Time Offer✨

Employer of Record in India at ($299) $169/month
Employer of Record in Mexico at ($399) $249/month

wdasds

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
union-imgcross icon
skuad logo

Hire, pay and manage your talent in 160+ countries.

wdasds

wdasds

wdasds

wdasds

wdasds

We respect your data. By submitting the form, you agree that we will contact you about our products and services, in accordance with our privacy policy.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
close icon
notification icon
 ✨ Access Skuad’s free Global Hiring Toolkit: E-books, guides, and more at your fingertips! ✨Explore now

Employment Laws in Mexico

Updated on:
16 Jan, 2024
Offer banner
G2 badge
Monthly
best value
Annually
Pay monthly at a discounted rate with a 12-month commitment
(Save upto 15%)
$
249
/month
(billed monthly)
G2 badge

Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries

G2 badge
EOR in 
Mexico
Monthly
$
299
/month
(billed annually)
Annually
Pay monthly at a discounted rate with a 12-month commitment
$
249
/month
(billed monthly)
Offer banner
Offer banner
G2 badge

Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries

Table of Content

Carrot icon

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Mexico is one of the attractive destinations for tech growth in South America. The country's allure comes from its low labor costs, its vast pool of tech talent and favorable government policies. However, hiring in Mexico involves an in-depth understanding of the Mexican labor laws, the intricate facets of employment contracts, and the processes involved in ensuring compliance with the employment laws in Mexico.

This guide highlights everything you need to know about navigating the legal terrain of Mexico and hiring tech talent compliantly in Mexico.

Overview of the Employment Laws in Mexico

Mexico's labor laws are governed by the Federal Labor Law (Ley Federal del Trabajo). Established in 1970 and significantly reformed in 2012 and 2019, the law outlines the rights and obligations of employers and Mexican employees. Its provisions cover all aspects of employment relationships, including employment contracts, minimum employment terms, leave policies, termination of employment, and data protection.

The Mexican federal labor law can be complex and may involve aspects such as collective bargaining agreements and employment agreements, to name a few.

One platform to grow your global team

Hire and pay talent globally, the hassle -free way with Skuad

Talk to an experteor pattern

Employment Contracts in Mexico

In Mexico, the creation of a labor relationship doesn't necessarily require a written contract. However, drafting a written employment agreement can offer protection for both the employer and employee, stipulating the terms of the employment relationship and minimizing potential misunderstandings.

While Mexican law does not mandate an employment agreement, with the advent of Mexican labor laws over time, it is crucial to have a written and well-drafted employment agreement. An example letter of agreement between an employer and employee can help organizations navigate the necessary components of such a contract. Still, it's advisable to seek local legal advice to ensure compliance with Mexico's labor laws.

Minimum Employment Terms

In the realm of employment, understanding the minimum terms is paramount to achieving a harmonious and legally-compliant work environment. In Mexico, these terms are mandated by law and apply to all forms of employment, including the growing sector of remote tech work.

Working Hours and Overtime

Mexican labor law sets a cap on the number of working hours per week. Day workers are limited to a maximum of 48 hours, mixed workers to 45 hours, and night workers to 42 hours. These parameters ensure a balance between productivity and the well-being of employees, which is essential in maintaining high-quality output, especially in the field of technology where overwork can often lead to burnout.

Furthermore, any overtime must be paid at double the regular wage rate, ensuring fair compensation for employees who contribute their extra time and effort. This is especially important when hiring employees, as project deadlines may occasionally require additional work hours.

Minimum Wage and Employee Benefits

As of 2024, the minimum wage in Mexico is set at MXN $248.93per day. However, for specialized roles, particularly in the tech industry, it is crucial to understand the market rate in order to attract the best talent. Mexican labor laws with their competitive cost of living and rich talent pool, present a compelling case for recruiting tech talent, as explored in this article.

Beyond wages, employee benefits also form a vital part of employment agreements. In Mexico, these benefits include annual profit sharing, paid vacations, vacation premiums, and contributions to social security and housing funds. Such comprehensive benefits can make your company an attractive option for the best tech talents, helping you build a high-performing, motivated team.

Compliance with Employment Terms

Strict compliance with these employment terms can help avoid penalties and litigation, ensuring a smoother operation of your remote teams in Mexico. Misclassification of independent contractors is one such potential area of conflict that companies should avoid. A complete understanding of the labor and employment laws in Mexico will help businesses avoid any missteps.

Equipped with a comprehensive understanding of the minimum employment terms in Mexico, businesses can better navigate the hiring process, minimize legal risks, and tap into the abundant tech talent in the country. It's advisable to stay updated with any changes in the law in Mexico and ensure that your business practices evolve accordingly to avoid common HR compliance mistakes.

Leave Policies

Leave policies in Mexico are clearly outlined by the Federal Labor Law, ensuring that all employees in Mexico have access to vacation, maternity, and sick leave benefits. With the growing trend of hiring tech talent remotely, it's crucial for businesses to fully comprehend these policies to maintain a positive and compliant work environment.

Vacation Leave

Under Mexican law, every employee is entitled to paid annual vacations. After completing one year of service, an employee earns a minimum of six days of vacation. For each subsequent year of service, two additional days are added up to twelve days. After the fourth year, the vacation period is increased by two days every five years. Employers are also required to pay a vacation premium of 25% of the employee's salary during their vacation period.

It's important to note that if the relationship between the employer and employee ends before the year of service is completed, the employee is entitled to a proportional payment for the vacation days accrued, as per Mexican labor laws.

Maternity Leave

Mexico has robust provisions to protect and support women during and after pregnancy. Pregnant employees are entitled to a paid maternity leave of 84 days, divided equally before and after childbirth. If childbirth results in disability, the leave period can be extended. These provisions are outlined in the labor laws of the Mexican constitution.

Employers should consider these provisions when planning their workforce needs and ensuring a supportive environment for their Mexican employees. They might also want to refer to a comprehensive guide on common legal troubles for global businesses and how to prevent them to mitigate any potential issues that might arise.

Sick Leave

While the Federal Labor Law doesn't explicitly outline a sick leave policy, it does state that employees in Mexico are entitled to social security benefits in case of an illness or injury that prevents them from working.

The Mexican Social Security Institute (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social - IMSS) provides these benefits, which include medical care and a portion of the employee's salary during their sickness period. The Social security law in Mexico, governed by the Mexican government ensures that the benefits and the social security law covers the employee's medical needs.

As a globally-minded business, employers may want to go beyond the basics and offer a more comprehensive healthcare plan. Such offerings not only ensure the well-being of the workforce but also serve as an attractive proposition for potential talent. You can find out more about countries that offer free healthcare and how you can incorporate similar models into your company's benefits structure.

Termination of Employment

Terminating an employment relationship in Mexico is an intricate process governed by stringent laws that seek to protect the rights of employees. Navigating this process requires a thorough understanding of the country's labor laws to avoid potential legal repercussions.

Understanding Just Cause for Termination

According to Federal Labor Law, both parties - the employer and the employee - can terminate the employment contract without liability, provided they have a justifiable cause. For the employer, just cause can range from an employee's disobedience, dishonesty, or disclosure of company secrets to workplace harassment, absenteeism, or consistent underperformance.

However, it's crucial to remember that the onus lies on the employer to prove the existence of a just cause should the employee challenge the termination in court. This could involve the collection and presentation of tangible evidence or testimonies corroborating the cause for termination. If unable to prove the just cause, the employer may face significant legal penalties or could be required to reinstate the employee.

The Severance Pay Requirement

In situations where an employer dismisses an employee without just cause, or the employee resigns due to a justified reason, the employer is required to pay severance to the employee. The amount typically includes three months of integrated salary, 20 days of integrated salary for each year of service, and a seniority premium equivalent to 12 days of salary per year of service. An understanding of these regulations falls under labor and employment laws.

Misclassification and Its Consequences

One important point to bear in mind is the misclassification of employees, a common error made by employers globally. Incorrectly classifying an employee as an independent contractor to circumvent employee benefits or statutory protection can have serious legal consequences, including issues related to collective bargaining agreements and overtime pay. For detailed insights on this issue, refer to this comprehensive guide on penalties for misclassification of independent contractors.

Balancing Termination and Talent Retention

While understanding the legalities of termination is important, so is maintaining a strong employer-employee relationship to prevent such circumstances. For companies expanding into Mexico's tech market, fostering a positive workplace culture is integral to attracting and retaining the best tech talents. To do this, it's critical to adhere to the employment law in Mexico and avoid common HR compliance mistakes.

For instance, there might be unique rules related tothe notice period and initial training of employees in Mexico. On the other side of the coin, labor unions and union leaders can play an important role in collective bargaining negotiations, which can be critical when formulating collective bargaining agreements. It's the responsibility of the Mexican government to oversee the process and ensure that all parties comply with the law.

Ultimately, being aware of the labor and employment laws and ensuring fair practices can help companies leverage the benefits of the thriving Mexican tech talent pool, without the worry of potential legal pitfalls.

Data Protection in Mexico

Mexico's Federal Law on the Protection of Personal Data Held by Private Parties regulates personal data protection. Employers must be aware of legal and tax risks when dealing with employee data. Consent is required for the processing of personal data, except in circumstances provided by law.

Ensure Compliance in Mexico with Skuad

Complying with employment laws in Mexico - or any country, for that matter - is an absolute necessity for organizations planning to build remote or distributed teams. The dynamics of Mexico's labor law might seem complex, but with a clear understanding and the right support, organizations can navigate this landscape successfully.

This is where Skuad comes in. As a global employment and payroll platform, Skuad enables organizations to hire, onboard, and manage contractors and employees across more than 160 countries in full compliance with local laws and regulations.

By partnering with Skuad, companies looking to tap into Mexico's vibrant tech talent pool can focus on their core business and strategic growth initiatives instead of getting entangled in legal complexities and administrative chores. Skuad's expertise in international employment laws minimizes the risk of legal issues and penalties, ensuring seamless, compliant operations across borders.

To learn more about how Skuad can support your global expansion while ensuring complete compliance, talk to Skuad experts today.

FAQs

What is Article 47 of the Mexican labor law?

Article 47 of the Mexican Federal Labor Law protects employers and co-employees against dishonesty, violence or harassment. The law makes provisions against immoral acts such as sexual harassment. It also ensures that the workplace is safe for all.

What is the minimum wage in Mexico City?

The minimum wage in Mexico has been set at MXN $248.93. The wage rate was reviewed and took effect from the 1st of January, 2024.

limited-offer-banner
EOR in 
Mexico
Monthly
best value
Annually
Pay monthly at a discounted rate with a 12-month commitment
$
249
/month
(billed annually)
G2 badge

Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries

G2 badge
limited-offer-banner
EOR in 
Mexico
Monthly
$
299
/month
(billed annually)
Annually
Pay monthly at a discounted rate with a 12-month commitment
$
249
/month
(billed monthly)
G2 badge

Employ contractors and employees in 160+ countries

G2 badge

Table of Content

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Employment Laws in Mexico

Employment Laws in Mexico

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Mexico is one of the attractive destinations for tech growth in South America. The country's allure comes from its low labor costs, its vast pool of tech talent and favorable government policies. However, hiring in Mexico involves an in-depth understanding of the Mexican labor laws, the intricate facets of employment contracts, and the processes involved in ensuring compliance with the employment laws in Mexico.

This guide highlights everything you need to know about navigating the legal terrain of Mexico and hiring tech talent compliantly in Mexico.

Overview of the Employment Laws in Mexico

Mexico's labor laws are governed by the Federal Labor Law (Ley Federal del Trabajo). Established in 1970 and significantly reformed in 2012 and 2019, the law outlines the rights and obligations of employers and Mexican employees. Its provisions cover all aspects of employment relationships, including employment contracts, minimum employment terms, leave policies, termination of employment, and data protection.

The Mexican federal labor law can be complex and may involve aspects such as collective bargaining agreements and employment agreements, to name a few.

One platform to grow your global team

Hire and pay talent globally, the
hassle-free way

Talk to an expert

Employment Contracts in Mexico

In Mexico, the creation of a labor relationship doesn't necessarily require a written contract. However, drafting a written employment agreement can offer protection for both the employer and employee, stipulating the terms of the employment relationship and minimizing potential misunderstandings.

While Mexican law does not mandate an employment agreement, with the advent of Mexican labor laws over time, it is crucial to have a written and well-drafted employment agreement. An example letter of agreement between an employer and employee can help organizations navigate the necessary components of such a contract. Still, it's advisable to seek local legal advice to ensure compliance with Mexico's labor laws.

Minimum Employment Terms

In the realm of employment, understanding the minimum terms is paramount to achieving a harmonious and legally-compliant work environment. In Mexico, these terms are mandated by law and apply to all forms of employment, including the growing sector of remote tech work.

Working Hours and Overtime

Mexican labor law sets a cap on the number of working hours per week. Day workers are limited to a maximum of 48 hours, mixed workers to 45 hours, and night workers to 42 hours. These parameters ensure a balance between productivity and the well-being of employees, which is essential in maintaining high-quality output, especially in the field of technology where overwork can often lead to burnout.

Furthermore, any overtime must be paid at double the regular wage rate, ensuring fair compensation for employees who contribute their extra time and effort. This is especially important when hiring employees, as project deadlines may occasionally require additional work hours.

Minimum Wage and Employee Benefits

As of 2024, the minimum wage in Mexico is set at MXN $248.93per day. However, for specialized roles, particularly in the tech industry, it is crucial to understand the market rate in order to attract the best talent. Mexican labor laws with their competitive cost of living and rich talent pool, present a compelling case for recruiting tech talent, as explored in this article.

Beyond wages, employee benefits also form a vital part of employment agreements. In Mexico, these benefits include annual profit sharing, paid vacations, vacation premiums, and contributions to social security and housing funds. Such comprehensive benefits can make your company an attractive option for the best tech talents, helping you build a high-performing, motivated team.

Compliance with Employment Terms

Strict compliance with these employment terms can help avoid penalties and litigation, ensuring a smoother operation of your remote teams in Mexico. Misclassification of independent contractors is one such potential area of conflict that companies should avoid. A complete understanding of the labor and employment laws in Mexico will help businesses avoid any missteps.

Equipped with a comprehensive understanding of the minimum employment terms in Mexico, businesses can better navigate the hiring process, minimize legal risks, and tap into the abundant tech talent in the country. It's advisable to stay updated with any changes in the law in Mexico and ensure that your business practices evolve accordingly to avoid common HR compliance mistakes.

Leave Policies

Leave policies in Mexico are clearly outlined by the Federal Labor Law, ensuring that all employees in Mexico have access to vacation, maternity, and sick leave benefits. With the growing trend of hiring tech talent remotely, it's crucial for businesses to fully comprehend these policies to maintain a positive and compliant work environment.

Vacation Leave

Under Mexican law, every employee is entitled to paid annual vacations. After completing one year of service, an employee earns a minimum of six days of vacation. For each subsequent year of service, two additional days are added up to twelve days. After the fourth year, the vacation period is increased by two days every five years. Employers are also required to pay a vacation premium of 25% of the employee's salary during their vacation period.

It's important to note that if the relationship between the employer and employee ends before the year of service is completed, the employee is entitled to a proportional payment for the vacation days accrued, as per Mexican labor laws.

Maternity Leave

Mexico has robust provisions to protect and support women during and after pregnancy. Pregnant employees are entitled to a paid maternity leave of 84 days, divided equally before and after childbirth. If childbirth results in disability, the leave period can be extended. These provisions are outlined in the labor laws of the Mexican constitution.

Employers should consider these provisions when planning their workforce needs and ensuring a supportive environment for their Mexican employees. They might also want to refer to a comprehensive guide on common legal troubles for global businesses and how to prevent them to mitigate any potential issues that might arise.

Sick Leave

While the Federal Labor Law doesn't explicitly outline a sick leave policy, it does state that employees in Mexico are entitled to social security benefits in case of an illness or injury that prevents them from working.

The Mexican Social Security Institute (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social - IMSS) provides these benefits, which include medical care and a portion of the employee's salary during their sickness period. The Social security law in Mexico, governed by the Mexican government ensures that the benefits and the social security law covers the employee's medical needs.

As a globally-minded business, employers may want to go beyond the basics and offer a more comprehensive healthcare plan. Such offerings not only ensure the well-being of the workforce but also serve as an attractive proposition for potential talent. You can find out more about countries that offer free healthcare and how you can incorporate similar models into your company's benefits structure.

Termination of Employment

Terminating an employment relationship in Mexico is an intricate process governed by stringent laws that seek to protect the rights of employees. Navigating this process requires a thorough understanding of the country's labor laws to avoid potential legal repercussions.

Understanding Just Cause for Termination

According to Federal Labor Law, both parties - the employer and the employee - can terminate the employment contract without liability, provided they have a justifiable cause. For the employer, just cause can range from an employee's disobedience, dishonesty, or disclosure of company secrets to workplace harassment, absenteeism, or consistent underperformance.

However, it's crucial to remember that the onus lies on the employer to prove the existence of a just cause should the employee challenge the termination in court. This could involve the collection and presentation of tangible evidence or testimonies corroborating the cause for termination. If unable to prove the just cause, the employer may face significant legal penalties or could be required to reinstate the employee.

The Severance Pay Requirement

In situations where an employer dismisses an employee without just cause, or the employee resigns due to a justified reason, the employer is required to pay severance to the employee. The amount typically includes three months of integrated salary, 20 days of integrated salary for each year of service, and a seniority premium equivalent to 12 days of salary per year of service. An understanding of these regulations falls under labor and employment laws.

Misclassification and Its Consequences

One important point to bear in mind is the misclassification of employees, a common error made by employers globally. Incorrectly classifying an employee as an independent contractor to circumvent employee benefits or statutory protection can have serious legal consequences, including issues related to collective bargaining agreements and overtime pay. For detailed insights on this issue, refer to this comprehensive guide on penalties for misclassification of independent contractors.

Balancing Termination and Talent Retention

While understanding the legalities of termination is important, so is maintaining a strong employer-employee relationship to prevent such circumstances. For companies expanding into Mexico's tech market, fostering a positive workplace culture is integral to attracting and retaining the best tech talents. To do this, it's critical to adhere to the employment law in Mexico and avoid common HR compliance mistakes.

For instance, there might be unique rules related tothe notice period and initial training of employees in Mexico. On the other side of the coin, labor unions and union leaders can play an important role in collective bargaining negotiations, which can be critical when formulating collective bargaining agreements. It's the responsibility of the Mexican government to oversee the process and ensure that all parties comply with the law.

Ultimately, being aware of the labor and employment laws and ensuring fair practices can help companies leverage the benefits of the thriving Mexican tech talent pool, without the worry of potential legal pitfalls.

Data Protection in Mexico

Mexico's Federal Law on the Protection of Personal Data Held by Private Parties regulates personal data protection. Employers must be aware of legal and tax risks when dealing with employee data. Consent is required for the processing of personal data, except in circumstances provided by law.

Ensure Compliance in Mexico with Skuad

Complying with employment laws in Mexico - or any country, for that matter - is an absolute necessity for organizations planning to build remote or distributed teams. The dynamics of Mexico's labor law might seem complex, but with a clear understanding and the right support, organizations can navigate this landscape successfully.

This is where Skuad comes in. As a global employment and payroll platform, Skuad enables organizations to hire, onboard, and manage contractors and employees across more than 160 countries in full compliance with local laws and regulations.

By partnering with Skuad, companies looking to tap into Mexico's vibrant tech talent pool can focus on their core business and strategic growth initiatives instead of getting entangled in legal complexities and administrative chores. Skuad's expertise in international employment laws minimizes the risk of legal issues and penalties, ensuring seamless, compliant operations across borders.

To learn more about how Skuad can support your global expansion while ensuring complete compliance, talk to Skuad experts today.

FAQs

What is Article 47 of the Mexican labor law?

Article 47 of the Mexican Federal Labor Law protects employers and co-employees against dishonesty, violence or harassment. The law makes provisions against immoral acts such as sexual harassment. It also ensures that the workplace is safe for all.

What is the minimum wage in Mexico City?

The minimum wage in Mexico has been set at MXN $248.93. The wage rate was reviewed and took effect from the 1st of January, 2024.

Building a remote team?

Employ exceptional talent, anywhere, anytime!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Skuad is the best solution to hire and expand globally.

Skuad makes building globally distributed teams, quick and hassle-free.

Request demo
start hiring